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Mass. Auditor Bump Exposes $15.4M in Welfare Fraud

Auditor Bump Focuses Efforts to Strengthen Public Benefits Programs
Announces that Her Office Identified a Record $15.4M in Public Benefits Fraud in FY16

 Boston, MA – Massachusetts State Auditor Suzanne Bump has released an annual report on her office’s efforts to identify fraud in the state’s social, safety net programs. 

The report released this week notes that in fiscal year 2016, the Bureau of Special Investigations (BSI) identified a record $15.4 million in public benefits fraud, marking a 12 percent increase over the previous year, and a sixth straight year of record-setting findings. In addition, the report highlights that for every dollar invested into BSI, it found $7.06 in fraud, a 14 percent increase over the previous year.

Finally, the report notes that for investigations with findings of fraud, the average finding was $14,783, a 21 percent increase over the previous year.

“From food assistance to medical care, public benefits play an important role in our state, the lives of its residents, and our economy,” Bump said.

 One case highlighted in the report describes a Rhode Island resident who was charged with fraudulently receiving benefits in excess of $60,000 from 2012 to 2015 from the state of Massachusetts. He falsely claimed to be a resident of the Commonwealth, and improperly reported his earned income.

“It is essential that these programs operate with integrity. That means fighting abuse and fraud, but it also requires that we work to identify the barriers that prohibit Massachusetts residents from accessing benefits for which they are eligible. This is why, in the coming year, we will undertake an audit to understand how effectively government is identifying those eligible persons who are not being served.”

“Since 2011, my office has increased the amount of fraud it has identified every year,” Bump said of the report.

“This is not an indication of more fraud, but that we are getting better at identifying it. We have accomplished this by focusing our efforts on the areas of greatest risk for substantial fraud such as food stamp trafficking, and fraudulent provider billing.”

BSI examiners work with state and federal agencies, including the Department of Transitional Assistance, MassHealth, the Department of Early Education and Care, the US Department of Agriculture, both the US and Massachusetts Attorneys General, and other government agencies to document fraudulent activity. Investigations focus both on tips related to individual recipient fraud, as well as provider fraud. The work leads to both prosecution and recovery of funds.

While the majority of investigations of public assistance fraud come from referrals from MassHealth, the Department of Transitional Assistance, or the use of data analytics, the public can also file a complaint through the BSI fraud hotline at (617) 727-6771 or by sending an email to infoline@sao.state.ma.us. All complaints are confidential.

The expanded efforts of Bump’s Office will concentrate on three areas:

  1. Continuing to identify and crack down on fraud in public benefits programs;
  2. Expanding information sharing with our partners and increasing our use of data analytics to identify fraud and concentrate on the areas most susceptible to fraud; and
  1. Conducting an audit in the coming year to identify barriers eligible Bay State residents face when seeking access to public benefits.

 For more information, visit www.mass.gov/auditor or follow Auditor Bump on Twitter @MassAuditor, on Facebook, orsubscribe to the Auditor’s Report e-newsletter.

Tom Duggan

Tom Duggan

Tom Duggan is president and publisher of The Valley Patriot Newspaper in North Andover, Massachusetts. He is an author, host of the Paying Attention TV/Radio Program, lectures on media bias and police issues, is a former Lawrence School Committeeman, former political director for Mass. Citizens Alliance, and a 1990 Police Survivor. You can email your comments to valleypatriot@aol.com.

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