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Valley Patriot of the Month – Lawrence Native Fred Pietrowski, U.S. Navy

HERO-Fred Pietrowski

Fred Pietrowski, U.S. Navy, 1959–1964, who served on submarines during the Cold War and Cuban Missile Crisis, shown with one of his beautiful woodcarvings. His many miraculous escapes from death—from encounters with sharks to subs rammed in half and sunk—are chronicled in his book, “De Profundis–Out of the Depths,” (spring 2013 publication date). Recently he gained national fame when he found $500,000 in stocks in an old file cabinet and, after a six-month search, returned it all to rightful owners. “I’ve received many blessings, and I want to pass them on to others,” he says.

 

By: Helen Mooradkanian – January 2013

LAWRENCE – It was early 1961 during the Cold War. The United States had just closed its embassy in Havana, Cuba. The Cuban Missile Crisis would not come to a head until one year later, in October 1962—the closest the U.S. and the Soviet Union ever came to a global nuclear war.

Fred Pietrowski, U.S. Navy, of Lawrence, Mass., was an electrician aboard the submarine USS Angler (SS240) when a goodwill tour to New York suddenly turned into a chase to drive off two Soviet diesel subs and capture a Soviet nuclear sub. Few know about that incident in early 1961 when Pietrowski discovered three submarines hiding near the Statue of Liberty, long before any major confrontation between the two world powers.

While crossing the North Atlantic in October 1962, Fred Pietrowski’s submarine, USS Entemedor (SS340), ran straight into Hurricane Ella’s 120-foot high waves. With air supply short, they could not submerge. When a rogue wave broadsided the sub, Fred became trapped in a sealed compartment that filled with 12 feet of water in 3 minutes. Horror-stricken crewmates watched helplessly through a 3-in. wide hatch window until Fred was finally able to open the 3,000-lb air pressure valve, allowing air to flow in and stop the flooding.

While crossing the North Atlantic in October 1962, Fred Pietrowski’s submarine, USS Entemedor (SS340), ran straight into Hurricane Ella’s 120-foot high waves. With air supply short, they could not submerge. When a rogue wave broadsided the sub, Fred became trapped in a sealed compartment that filled with 12 feet of water in 3 minutes. Horror-stricken crewmates watched helplessly through a 3-in. wide hatch window until Fred was finally able to open the 3,000-lb air pressure valve, allowing air to flow in and stop the flooding.

From the port lookout, Fred had focused his binoculars on the Statue of Liberty, only 800 feet away. Suddenly he saw a Soviet periscope pop up out of the water only 300 yards from the Statue. When reported to their New London, Conn., base, the order came: “Chase him!”

Minutes later, Fred saw a second Soviet submarine hiding only a half-mile from Wall Street! Again the order: “Chase him!”

Then they heard the turbine whine of a nuclear sub. The unmarked sub refused to identify itself! This time, they were told: “Ram him!”

Instantly, five U.S. submarines sped to the scene. All six American subs spent three days, 24/7, trying to capture the Soviet nuclear sub for its technology. “We chased it all the way down the coast to Virginia, where it took off.”

Three Soviet subs hiding, undetected, in New York harbor! “Each missile on a submarine has 157 nuclear warheads—enough to blow up the East Coast from DC to Boston,” Pietrowski points out. “Surely, God was protecting us.”

Fred Pietrowski

Fred Pietrowski, U.S.N., served as electrician on WWII diesel submarines in the early 1960s. Like all submariners, he received in-depth cross-training in every job aboard the sub.

Fred joined the Navy in 1959, after graduating from Central Catholic. His life in the Navy and civilian life has been a series of miraculous escapes from the jaws of death, literally.

“Shark!”

In October 1962, Fred was deployed to the Mediterranean on a three-week patrol, a secret mission, aboard the submarine USS Entemedor (SS340). Under Sealed Orders.

“Not even our captain knew where we were heading or our destination. If anything happened to us, we were told, ‘You were never there!’ ”

Unknown to them, it was the beginning of the Cuban Missile Crisis.

“We went into ‘ultra quiet mode’—like a ghost ship floating through the ocean depths. No air conditioners. No unnecessary movement. I took only twenty-one steps from my bunk to my workplace, and only seven steps to eat. No emptying garbage at sea (the enemy could track us).

“For three weeks we endured suffocating heat without a shower—140 degrees where I worked, 125 degrees in the rest of the boat. It hurt to breathe though my nose. The stench of rotting garbage filled our nostrils.

“After two weeks, our main electric propulsion motors began to overheat. Now at 179 degrees, they would automatically shut off at 180 degrees, forcing us to float to the surface—like a “sitting duck!”

“We took photos through the periscope for intelligence gathering—without any idea of what we were photographing—missile sites, installations, or vessels. We laid 36 mines at a time. Finally, mission accomplished, we left the area undetected and surfaced.

FredPietrowski2“Once far removed from our mission zone, the captain stopped our sub and with engines running let us cool off with a swim. Two men were posted on shark-watch, armed with M-1 rifles. We splashed around, playing basketball with the five officers.”

Suddenly, someone screamed, “SHARK!”

“I saw a gigantic black fin, over a foot high, moving swiftly toward us! It was a 35-foot long Great White Shark, our captain later told us. At the slightest movement in the water, it will attack at speeds to 15 mph.

“A football field away lay our submarine…

“To the torpedo-shaped shark, our submarine looked, and smelled, like its prey, a large black whale: round, with wide black diving ‘fins’ in the front and back. The exhaust of our diesel engines sprayed fishy-smelling bilge water along with smoke.” The Great White, naturally curious, swam up alongside the sub and kept taking sample bites of the submarine—first circling one way, then the other—hour after hour. “Whenever the shark swam to the other side, we would swim toward the sub. Whenever he came toward us, we formed a tight group and floated, holding still.”

One hour went by. Two. Three…After six hours, with the hungry shark still circling the sub, the captain yelled, “It’ll be dark soon. Come in, or I’ll have to leave you here…”

“We had no choice but to swim toward our sub—and the hungry shark.

“When we were 100 feet from our boat, we made a dash for it. But there was only one set of foot holes leading up to the deck—and sixty-five men in the water!”

Fred was among the last twelve remaining in the water when he heard, “Here he comes!”

“Swim forward and stand on the diving planes,” yelled the captain. Twelve men squeezed together on the diving plane—no bigger than a kitchen table—while knee-deep in water.

“The Great White headed straight for me, passing right under my bare feet! His mouth opened wide—exposing multiple rows of 300 serrated teeth!

“At one point he was only 8 feet away, staring at my chest!

“Miraculously, we all made it to safety.”

Hurricane Ella

Leaving the Mediterranean from that mission, the Entemedor headed straight into the North Atlantic Ocean and into the teeth of Hurricane Ella, with its 115-mph winds that tossed them like a toy boat for days. “With less than one day’s air supply, we could not submerge. We had to ride out the hurricane.”

“On day four, a 120-ft high rogue wave—an almost vertical wall of water—slammed us broadside. I was tossed 20 feet through the air. Our sub rolled radically to the right—stopping at a 57-degree angle (a 54-degree angle is the point of no return). All oil drained out of engines. We lost power. There we hung, in total darkness!

At that radical angle, over a thousand gallons of sulfuric acid would spill out from batteries. If mixed with salt water, it would form a deadly chlorine gas that spelled instant death.

“In that darkness, with hydraulic oil flowing all over the tiled deck, I crawled over pipes and cables, feeling my way to the main battery switch, finally found it and turned it on. Immediately the lights and power came on, the engine propellers began to turn. Slowly the submarine rose to a vertical position. The fact that we survived is a miracle.”

It took them eleven days to cross the Atlantic.

“Before arriving in New London, we posted armed guards. This was unusual. Waiting at the gate were Marines, standing shoulder to shoulder, armed with machine guns. The Cuban Missile Crisis, we learned later, had begun.”

Fred’s escapes from death also include: Almost falling on the back of a 16-foot shark. Being trapped in a sealed compartment filled with 12 feet of water. Submarine rammed, cut in half, and sunk—twice. A head-long fall that split open his skull, with doctors giving him up for dead.

Fred bears witness to the Navy hymn, “Eternal Father, Strong to Save.” From experience, he knows the Biblical truth: “The eternal God is your refuge, And underneath are the everlasting arms” (Deuteronomy 33:27).

Thank you Fred for your service to our country. You are truly a Valley Patriot and a Hero in Our Midst!

 

HelenMooradkanianHelen Mooradkanian is our Valley Patriot Hero columnist and a former business writer. She is also a member of the Merrimack Valley Tea Party, You can email Helen at hsmoor@verizon.net

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The Valley Patriot is a free monthly journal of news, commentary, and events, serving Northern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire.

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4 Responses to Valley Patriot of the Month – Lawrence Native Fred Pietrowski, U.S. Navy

  1. Frederick Pietrowski Reply

    February 8, 2013 at 4:06 PM

    These are a few of my events, other veterans have lived through like encounters and are lost with them. Hollywood has not been fair to what really happens and Mc Hales Navy is the only picture of our life depicted.. Standing on My Submarine deck on lookout in a storm with seven layers of clothes on bound by a six inch canvas belt with a four inch leather belt on top I face the on comming waves.Held my breath while the one hundred ft – plus high waves crashed down on top of me. When the wave cleared my mouth I took a breath and blinked my eye lashes before they froze together, looking through the icicles hanging from my eye brows..

  2. Ray Hammond Reply

    August 21, 2013 at 3:43 PM

    I must be getting old I was on the entemedor from July 62 until sept 64 and do not recall any of this.

    • Ernest Mitchell Reply

      February 19, 2014 at 4:52 PM

      Ray I was also on the USS Entemedor from July 1962 and made the Med run, I as well do not remember things happening this way, we did spend some time on a secret mission off the UAR at the time observing the Soviet Navy as they played war games around us we charged our batteries at night and never surfaced for about 3 weeks. At some point in time on the cruise we banged screws with another sub in the gulf of de Palma and had to limp into Toulon France to await a prop from the states. On the return trip from Rota Spain on the surface due to the Cuban Missle crisis we did encounter extremely rough weather and I was the one on deck when the wave that we encountered did partially flood the conning tower thought I was going to drown from being under water for so long Captain McFarland and LCDR Bibby secured the topside watch and we maintained our watch through the periscopes until the weather calmed down. I cannot remember the name of the OID that day but thank the Lord we were secured with lifelines or we would have been gone. We did cruise around Cuba for a few days on the return to New London. I was a Yoeman striker at the time, qualified on the cruise and went to Portsmouth for the Overhaul and was transferred to COMSUBRON 10 on board the USS Fulton for the rest of my Active duty tour. I do remember Fred but cannot remember you
      Ernest Mitchell
      YN2(SS)
      1962-1964 On Board Entemedor and Squadron 10

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